Canadian film

Algonquin Review

The Canadian indie drama Algonquin is a perfect example of a rare kind of film: the kind of idea that sounds terrible on paper or in a pitch, but one that works just fine in practice.

Interview: Jonathan Hayes

We talk to Jonathan Hayes, director of the Canadian drama Algonquin about the clashing egos within his film's characters, the concept of denial and distance within families, and how his film is now related directly to the work of Casablanca director Michael Curtiz.

Cas & Dylan Review

An unpretentious road comedy with a cosmically aligned odd couple, Cas & Dylan gets incredible mileage thanks to great leading performances from veteran actor Richard Dreyfuss and rising star Tatiana Maslany.

Down River Review

While it could have very easily descended into movie-of-the-week territory, Benjamin Ratner’ Canadian drama Down River eschews cliché in a thoughtful, well acted look at several generations of women at crossroads in their lives.

Video Interview:
Brent Butt

We sit down with beloved Canadian stand-up and TV legend Brent Butt in this video interview about his first major big screen outing in the mystery/comedy No Clue.

Solo Review

The Canadian thriller Solo lives up to its modest title and supplies no more and no less than what’s needed to be effective. A stripped down killer-on-the-loose yarn and survival narrative, first time feature filmmaker Isaac Cravit has crafted a taut, beautifully shot, and well performed reworking of genre formula.

Interview: Annie Clark

We talk with former Degrassi: The Next Generation actress Annie Clark about her first starring role on the big screen in the Canadian thriller Solo and about her thoughts on modern thrillers, why she chose filming over a vacation, why she never became a camp counsellor herself, and the freedom of being able to get a little down and dirty for the sake of the character.

Interview: Andrew and Adam Gray

We talk to brothers Andrew and Adam Gray, the documentarians behind Fly Colt Fly, a look at the almost unbelievable crime spree of 19 year old thief Colton Harris-Moore, about what first drew them to Colton as a subject, the sometimes unbelievable nature of his escapes from SWAT teams and army helicopters, how their love of comics helped in the mythological animated sequences of the film, the dangers Andrew put his own brother-in-law through for the live action recreations, how people from Colton’s younger days were more sympathetic, and how this film almost got them shot... twice.

Sex After Kids Review

While certainly a bit overstuffed with several barely intersecting storylines, the ensemble Canadian indie comedy Sex After Kids has great performances, an ear for truthful humor, and certainly a little something for everybody.

Interview: The Cast and Director of Sex After Kids

We talk to writer/director Jeremy LaLonde and actors Kate Hewlett, Amanda Brugel, and Zoie Palmer about their work on the ensemble independent Canadian comedy Sex After Kids about finding the right people for the roles, assembling a film out of a lot of different parts in a small amount of time, letting go of your ego to play something realistically for laughs, not being able to keep straight faces, and why Jeremy jokingly made his low budget independent film sound even lower budget than it really was.

Interview: Pat Kiely

We talk to Being Human actor and filmmaker Pat Kiely about his second feature film as a director (the proudly un-romantic comedy Three Night Stand), the time between making his first feature and getting around to this one, the advantages of working with great friends and collaborators, the downside to shooting in the dead of winter, and why he’s tired of audiences being fed the same old rom-com clichés over and over again.

Interview: Jeff Barnaby

We talk to Rhymes for Young Ghouls director Jeff Barnaby his film’s recent successes, the mundane nature of small town life that can lead some to less than exemplary behaviour, treating even his villains as humans, the mixed reaction the film has received within the native film community, and why it was a no brainer to use a female protagonist to tell a deeply personal story that stays true to his own experiences.

Whitewash Review

Whitewash is an ambitious, if decidedly problematic debut Canadian feature that’s arriving in theatres at the perfect time.