film

Alan Partridge Review

It’s not necessary to have an intimate knowledge of actor and writer Steve Coogan’s most famous alter ego to enjoy Alan Partridge and the several British television series and specials the character has popped up in, but it does give a slight advantage to those who do.

300: Rise of an Empire Review

Although Zack Snyder might have moved on to only being a co-producer and co-writer to the Frank Miller inspired sequel 300: Rise of an Empire, the film delivers largely a carbon copy of the same material, slinging spears, swords, splatter, and splinters in slo-motion similarly, only this time it's incredibly boring to sit through.

Mr. Peabody & Sherman Review

It took the better part of 60 years, but finally the work of master animator Jay Ward has a proper big screen adaptation in Rob Minkoff’s Mr. Peabody & Sherman. It stays faithful to the tone of the original show, delivers all new jokes, enhances the characters without destroying them, and by just updating the material enough so it doesn’t feel like a forced attempt at being hip.

No Clue Review

It was only a matter of time before Canadian TV star and stand-up comic Brent Butt would make the jump to the big screen, but while the bumbling gumshoe comedy No Clue boasts a decent mystery and story, the comedy feels like Butt trying to create a new TV series instead of a big screen star vehicle for himself.

Like Father, Like Son Review

The winner of the Jury prize at Cannes last year, Hirokazu Kore-eda's family drama Like Father, Like Son is a thoughtful, methodical and serious examination of a concept usually played humorously.

Video Interview:
Brent Butt

We sit down with beloved Canadian stand-up and TV legend Brent Butt in this video interview about his first major big screen outing in the mystery/comedy No Clue.

Interview: Rob Minkoff

We talk to filmmaker Rob Minkoff, who returns to entirely animated feature filmmaking for the first time in 20 years (following his success with some obscure movie called The Lion KingMr. Peabody and Sherman this weekend. We talk about balancing the cartoon’s old school feel with new school storytelling techniques, what it’s like returning to animation, how long the film was in development, why he’s generally averse to overdoing pop culture references in films, and why Jay Ward’s work stands up so well on its own after so long.