Ingrid Veninger

Interview: Ingrid Veninger

We talk to Canadian filmmaker Ingrid Veninger about her work on The Animal Project and how the film came together as a co-op sort of operation, how her casting process worked, how her personal experiences fit into a story about acting, and why the project was a fun and rewarding thing that she’ll probably never attempt again.

Hotel Congress Review

Brechtian and Beckettian in the same breath, Nadia Litz’s heady rom-com satire Hotel Congress owes as much to classic literature as it does to cinema of the French new wave and modern mumblecore.

Interview: Nadia Litz

We talk to the writer, director, and actress Nadia Litz about her $1,000 budgeted Hotel Congress (opening Friday at the TIFF Bell Lightbox), the precise construction of her film’s dialogue and themes, and the push and pull between manners and self-awareness.

Interview: The Butler Brothers

We talk to filmmakers Jason and Brett Butler about their $1,000 budgeted dark comedy Mourning Has Broken and about expanding the film to feature length, how they kind of bluffed their way through their initial pitch with producer Ingrid Veninger, their collaboration with actor Robert Nolan, and how they like to keep audiences guessing.

TIFF 2013: The Animal Project Review

The Animal Project Contemporary World Cinema Director: Ingrid Veninger It’s unfortunate that Ingrid Veninger’s new film, The Animal Project, is ultimately unsuccessful as a larger piece, because the scattered moments of human observation that make up the film are almost always careful and poignant. Sadly, the situation created to spark all these moments feels out […]

Me, the bees, and cancer Review

The first film to get a wide release from producer and Toronto filmmaker Ingrid Veninger's 1K Wave, Me, the bees and cancer tells the inspiring story of a local entertainment industry icon and near life long homeopath who wasn't about to let a little lymphoma get him down.

TIFF 2011 Picks Part Three: Hidden Gems

Lost in a sea of major Hollywood releases and hyped international films are the hidden gems of the Toronto International Film Festival. Andrew Parker has picked three films that are defintely not your typical fare, but that he believes are nonetheless worthy of your time and attention.