Marion Cotillard

Assassin’s Creed Review

With Assassin’s Creed, Ubisoft has demonstrated the ability to make a competent film, but it utterly fails to recognize what it is that people like about its signature franchise.

Two Days, One Night Review

Marion Cotillard and the Dardennes deliver an emotionally wrenching and truthful modern commentary with Two Days, One Night, a drama that moves like a thriller.

TFCA Announces 2014 Award Winners

Led by Best Picture, Director, and Supporting Actress winner Boyhood, the Toronto Film Critics Association has announced their award winners for the best of film in 2014.

TIFF 2014: Two Days, One Night Review

Two Days One Night  Special Presentations  Two Days, One Night, the latest film by Jean and Luc Dardenne, has one of those tidy premises that lends itself well to a concise pitch: a woman has one weekend to convince coworkers to give up their bonuses so that she may keep her job. To expand on […]

Rust and Bone Review

There are moments and certainly performances within Rust and Bone that flat out demand attention and praise. Yet somehow, those little pieces never add up to anything more than very well made melodramatic twaddle.

TIFF 2012 Reviews: Part 1

With the 2012 Toronto International Film Festival kicking off this Thursday, Dork Shelf begins their coverage of the Festival of Festivals with our look at Dredd 3D, The Sessions, Krivina, Rust and Bone, I Declare War, The Perks of Being a Wallflower, and the huge opening night gala, Looper.

The Dark Knight Rises Review

An appropriate end to the Christopher Nolan cycle of serious Batman films, The Dark Knight Rises manages to up the stakes in terms of action, suspense, and even in terms of wit. On the other hand, it’s not hard to say that this third instalment with Christian Bale behind the cowl is the least of the franchise, but most of the problems this time our are fairly nitpicky in nature and come mostly when Nolan seemingly needs to force himself to get serious again when even the director seems like he just wants to have some actual fun for a change.

Contagion Review

Director Steven Soderbergh takes on a deadly viral outbreak in his latest film, Contagion, with the same episodic story structure that he employed when he took on the war on drugs in Traffic. What this means is that Contagion is a very well made and often fascinating film that feels longer than it really is and it forgets about most of its characters at fairly inopportune times. The two films could really play side by side as a double bill of Soderbergh procedurals. They have almost the exact same strengths and the exact same faults.