Toronto International Film Festival 2013

Interview: Ben Wheatley

We talk to British director Ben Wheatlely: the man behind Kill List, Sightseers, and this weekend's A Field in England (Oh, and a couple of upcoming Doctor Who episodes) about how he never makes the same film twice, his film’s sense of language, how he directs actors, working with his writer as a co-editor, and his thoughts on his own special kind of genre filmmaking.

Interview: Maxwell McCabe-Lokos & Bruce McDonald

We talk to actor and writer Maxwell McCabe-Lokos and notable Canadian director Bruce McDonald about their collaboration on the dark comedy The Husband (opening at the TIFF Bell Lightbox this Friday) and about the film’s sense of brevity, their collaboration, what shooting the film digitally brought to the production, avoiding melodrama, trying to find the right tone for the film, and why the film’s most pivotal scene is also the most universally relatable one.

The Armstrong Lie Review

Alex Gibney’s firsthand look into the rise and fall of cyclist Lance Armstrong, The Armstrong Lie, becomes even more increasingly interesting as a result of how flawed the film is overall. It’s not that Gibney’s points about the tarnished seven time Tour de France champion and cancer survivor’s deceptions and lies about doping allegations aren’t perceptive or valid, but with a bloated and unwarranted running time north of two hours it’s not only about its subject’s inability to come clean. In many ways it’s an almost overly emotional document of Gibney’s own inability to let go of his own film.

In Brief: All the Wrong Reasons & Blue is the Warmest Color

As our film editor continues to play catch up after a crazy couple of weeks for new releases, he takes a look at the Canadian drama All the Wrong Reasons (co-starring the late Cory Monteith) and the heavily talked about French romance Blue is the Warmest Color. The movies might be vastly different, but his opinion is the same on both: They're just okay.

Interview: John Krokidas

Dork Shelf talks to Kill Your Darlings director John Krokidas about humbling your idols, the Beat Generation, youthful ambitions, working with Daniel Radcliffe, and wondering aloud about Glen Danzig’s past

Hi-Ho Mistahey! Review

Famed First Nations filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin takes a look at one Northern Ontario community's decade long fight for a new school in the documentary Hi-Ho Mistahey!, a suitably rabble-rousing and eye opening look at how the Canadian government has turned a blind eye to a community in need of something that should be seen as a basic human right.

Dallas Buyers Club Review

A definite high point in the still rising career Matthew McConaughey, and a very good, but lesser film in the career of Canadian director Jean-MarcVallee, Dallas Buyers Club runs a bit overlong, but it delivers a firm emotional punch at the hands of an unrepentant and initially reprehensible protagonist.

Man of Tai Chi Review

Although heavily westernized, Keanu Reeves’ fictional directorial debut Man of Tai Chi will hold some thrills and excitement for those who aren’t too picky about their martial arts epics.

The Fifth Estate Review

Although it gets off to a pretty rough start and is a bit overstuffed, Bill Condon’s somewhat fictionalized “inside WikiLeaks” drama The Fifth Estate manages to generate some thrills once it gets the dynamics of the larger than life characters out of the way.