EUFF 2013: Dinner With My Sisters Review

Dinner with My Sisters

Dinner with My Sisters

The look and feel in Dinner with My Sisters could very well belong in a Greek tourism video: shots of open fields, clear, blue skies and sleek, white architecture capture the beauty of Cyprus in this family drama, but outside of its production design the film falls short.

The clunky story features Andrea (Andreas Karras), a London-based Greek doctor who returns to his home country, finding an unwelcoming family of sisters guarding secrets about their father’s untimely death. Andrea slowly uncovers the truth while his embittered two elder sisters, Maria (Popi Avraam) and Olga (Nadia Charalambous), scoff at him for not being a real man because he left their family behind, and make menacing racist remarks about his girlfriend in Greek. 

Maria and Olga are understandably angry about their family’s past—their father inadvertently hurt them in unimaginable ways—the real nature of his death is entirely accidental. When that kernel of truth finally comes out, everyone somehow magically achieves catharsis and they all live happily ever after. What is bewildering and quite problematic about this ending is that the film is so focused on the innocuous death of the family patriarch that it overrides the sisters’ much more tragic ordeals and thereby negates them. Amusingly, had Dinner with My Sisters simply switched around its narrative order, it could have at least provided a semi-satisfying Greek tragedy. (Tina Hassania)

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Screens

Friday, November 15th, The Royal, 8:30pm

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