Charlie Day

Pacific Rim: Uprising Review

If you're looking for something to see with a younger person in your life or just want to see some silly, larger-than-life action, Pacific Rim: Uprising might just be the movie for you.

There And Back Again: Is Vacation Worth the Trip?

Vacation manages to stand on its own while also paying tribute to the original National Lampoon film. The jokes are raunchy, the cameos are plenty, and the ride is worth it if you're not overly sentimental about this kind of thing.

The June Home Entertainment Round-Up

Time once again for our writers to look to their latest Blu-Ray, DVD, and VOD purchases with looks at new releases The Lego Movie, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Alan Partridge, Small Time, The Cold Lands, Tapped Out, and A Wife Alone, and re-releases for The Life Aquatic, Judex, Hearts and Minds, The Revengers, and Countess Dracula.

The Lego Movie Review

Everything about The Lego Movie is awesome. An astoundingly smart, gut busting comedy with an anti-corporate message tied into the greatest virtues of one of the most beloved brands on Earth, Phil Lord and Chris Miller's exceptional film for people of all ages deserves to be talked about in the same breath as Monsters Inc. and Fantastic Mr. Fox when talking about the best animated comedies of the new millennium.

Blu-Ray Round-Up: 10/28/13

This week on the home entertainment front, we take a look at new Blu-Rays for Pacific Rim, Slap Shot, R.I.P.D., High Plains Drifter, and Eyes without a Face.

Pacific Rim Review

Despite a cliche, overly melodramatic story and grating comedic relief characters, Pacific Rim is still a more than worthy summer blockbuster.

Monsters University Review

As far as Pixar movie standards go, Monsters University is a bit of a mess with sloppy plotting and and unclear motives as to who the movie is actually made for... and yet, it's still extremely endearing and funny getting a solid B- for its efforts overall.

Horrible Bosses Review

Horrible Bosses does a great job at being good, despite an underwhelming premise. It is one of those films that succeeds by virtue of its casting. Jason Sudeikis, Charlie Day, and Jason Bateman have made a living playing funny straight men: people who want to be normal but their environment won’t let them. They play three middle aged guys who have a typical complaint: they hate their bosses. These bosses, however, are not just annoying kind, but the life destroying kind.