Chris O’Dowd

Mascots Review

Christopher Guest and company are back for the first time in 10 years in the new made-for-Netflix flick, Mascots.

TIFF 2014: St. Vincent Review

St. Vincent Special Presentations In what might be Bill Murray’s best chance at Oscar gold yet, the comedic actor plays a boorish, loutish, scoundrel who helps a young man learn how to stand up for himself. It’s basically a kinder, gentler, funnier Gran Torino (or a white trash, Brooklyn version of his character in Rushmore) […]

Calvary Review

Those expecting something light from the re-teaming of writer/director John Michael McDonagh and actor Brendan Gleeson in Calvary will be in for a coal black shock, but they're also in for one of the best films of the year.

The Dork Shelf Guide to the Toronto Irish Film Festival

We take an overview of this year's Toronto Irish Film Festival (starting this Friday and running through Sunday at the TIFF Bell Lightbox) and review the delightful opening night documentary The Irish Pub and the not so delightful indie drama Made in Belfast.

Epic Review

Shoddy and forgettable, Epic might be one of the most ill titled films ever. It seems more like wishful thinking than an actual title. It's the first major high profile misfire of the summer.

Contest: See THE SAPPHIRES Across Canada!

Enter for a chance to win one of five pairs of passes to an advance screening of The Sapphires in Toronto, Ottawa, Halifax, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, or Victoria on Wednesday, March 27th at 7:00pm (7:30 in Ottawa, only) courtesy of Dork Shelf and eOne Films.

This is 40 Review

Despite not being able to fully balance the autobiographical elements of This is 40 within his top heavy screenplay, Judd Apatow still delivers a loose, but satisfying slice of life comedy.

TIFF 2012 Reviews: Part 2

Day two of our TIFF 2012 coverage rolls on with looks at Anna Karenina, The Iceman, Antiviral, No, Amour, The Sapphires, Pusher, The Secret Disco Revolution, and What Richard Did.

Friends With Kids Review

In her first directorial effort and her third screenplay, actress Jennifer Westfeldt has crafted a film that has the look and feel of a modern, feminist Woody Allen film. Friends With Kids balances observational laughs and pathos quite deftly amongst a band of well-to-do New Yorkers with the help of a stellar cast. It shows the growing pains of a talent trying something new, but the strengths greatly outweigh the minuses brought on as a result of a misguided ending.