Michelle Pfeiffer

Play It Again, TIFF

Anchored by a week long run of a restoration of The Godfather Part II, the TIFF Bell Lightbox takes a look at some of history's greatest sequels with their latest film series.

The Family Review

While it would be nice to say that the oddball Mafioso comedy The Family is a great return to form for French auteur Luc Besson, it wouldn’t be true. At best, it’s an intriguing misfire, full of style over substance, but the substance should be beefed up and the style cut back considerably.

Contest: See THE FAMILY Across Canada!

Enter for a chance to win one of ten pairs of passes to an advance screening of The Famly in Toronto, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, or Victoria on Wednesday, September 4th, courtesy of Dork Shelf and eOne Films.

People Like Us Review

Obnoxious, absurd, and sentimentalized to the point that could even Hallmark greeting card writers vomit, People Like Us wastes of the talent of the people who made it and the time of the people unfortunate enough to watch it.

Dark Shadows Review

While definitely closer in tone to what director Tim Burton should be making with his vivid imagination, wit, and eye for detail, Dark Shadows shouldn’t be heralded as a comeback for the director just yet. The potential for this film to serve as a middle ground between the big haired auteur’s beloved Edward Scissorhands and Beetlejuice feels somewhat squandered by a lightweight script and a really terrible final 20 minutes.

Tim Burton Takes Toronto – Part 2

Part two of Sasha's Tim Burton Takes Toronto examines the director's late 80s and early 90s work: Batman, Edward Scissorhands and Batman Returns. From 7 p.m. on Friday, November 26 to some ungodly hour on the morning of Sunday, November 28th, Torontonians were invited to TIFF Bell Lightbox to screen the entirety of Tim Burton’s filmography. This was in celebration of the Burton exhibit coming to town, which was first curated by the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. For some, myself included, the prospect of sitting through sixteen feature films by Burton was intriguing — a Burton Blitz of sorts. Others might call it “Hell on Earth”.