Human Rights Watch Film Festival 2014: Highway of Tears Review

Highway of Tears

Highway of Tears

Aside from the victims of high profile serial killer trial of Robert Pickton, more than 40 women and possibly hundreds more have gone missing along the tragically monikered Highway of Tears in Vancouver. Home to a large First Nations population still scarred from years of residential schooling abuse and a constantly acrimonious relationship with the RCMP, the stretch of Northern, BC highway running from Prince George to Prince Rupert has become often described as a breeding ground and hideout for potential serial killers and copycats that prey on often young women of colour who can’t find access to proper transportation.

Directed by Matt Smiley and narrated by Nathan Fillion, this in house production for Human Rights Watch certainly goes a long way to explain how geography, the stigma of past offenses, and the mistreatment of others over a long period of time can foster a dangerous environment and culture for women. It’s a well meaning and certainly well informed documentary that at times might be just a tad too melodramatic for its own good, but it does go a long way in terms of reminding people that the problems of First Nations people often go tragically unnoticed until white people get involved in some why, and quite often for the worst. (Andrew Parker)

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Thursday, March 6th, 6:30pm, TIFF Bell Lightbox

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