Bill Murray

Aloha Review

Cameron Crowe's ensemble rom com Aloha has all the ingredients that should make audiences love it, but the script feels sloppy, with a beginning that's too messy and an ending that's too clean.

TIFF 2014: St. Vincent Review

St. Vincent Special Presentations In what might be Bill Murray’s best chance at Oscar gold yet, the comedic actor plays a boorish, loutish, scoundrel who helps a young man learn how to stand up for himself. It’s basically a kinder, gentler, funnier Gran Torino (or a white trash, Brooklyn version of his character in Rushmore) […]

Fast Five: Jim Jarmusch’s Cinema of Cool

In honour of the TIFF Bell Lightbox kicking off a retrospective dedicated to one of America's best filmmakers this week, we count down our five favourite films from the reigning king of indie coolness, Jim Jarmusch.

The June Home Entertainment Round-Up

Time once again for our writers to look to their latest Blu-Ray, DVD, and VOD purchases with looks at new releases The Lego Movie, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Alan Partridge, Small Time, The Cold Lands, Tapped Out, and A Wife Alone, and re-releases for The Life Aquatic, Judex, Hearts and Minds, The Revengers, and Countess Dracula.

The Monuments Men Review

While it has some enjoyable moments, a complete lack of character development and an unsure storyline make George Clooney's latest directorial effort, the all star World War II period piece The Monuments Men, a bit of a ponderous disappointment.

Bros, Bras, Blunts, & Balls

With TOGA! The Reinvention of the American Comedy, the TIFF Bell Lightbox looks back on the history of the gross out, bro-down comedy with looks at three of our own personal favourites.

Interview: Roman Coppola

We talk to A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III writer and director and current Academy Award nominee Roman Coppola about creating his latest trippy, mind bending comedy, working with Liam Hayes on the film's groovy soundtrack, subliminal messages in advertising, working with Charlie Sheen and Bill Murray, and why he likes coming back to the same kinds of characters.

Hyde Park on Hudson Review

Despite Bill Murray doing an okay job as FDR, Hyde Park on Hudson should have spent less time on actively trying to get Oscars by any means necessary (and goofy, tactfully shot handjobs) and instead should have aimed for a film with some actual substance.

The New Old: Love & Darkness

This week's archival home entertainment column takes a look at some real heavy hitters with Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train, Wong Kar Wai's In the Mood for Love, Stanley Kubrick's Fear and Desire, the campy Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?, and director's cuts of both Frank Oz's Little Shop of Horrors and the Al Pacino ham-fest The Devil's Advocate.