Jason Reitman

Home Entertainment Review: Men, Women, and Children

Men, Women, and Children (Jason Reitman, 2014) – Jason Reitman is a tough director to pin down. He clearly wants to be taken seriously and often attempts to dive into dark subject matter. Yet, he’s also a crowd-pleaser who tugs on emotions manipulatively and craves populist response/box office. So that leads to muddled movies from […]

TIFF 2014: Men, Women, & Children Review

Men, Women, & Children Special Presentations Despite chronically lapsing into the kind of melodrama that only parents who would bubble wrap their kids to keep them from from getting hurt would love, this story of the internets and the interconnectedness of our daily wired lives told through the microcosm of a small Texas town represents […]

TIFF 2014: Whiplash Review

Miles Teller and J.K. Simmons deliver the best leading performances of their careers in this intensely heart-pounding game of musical one-upmanship.

Labor Day Review

A major misstep for the usually reliable Jason Reitman, the flat out bizarre romantic drama Labor Day can never settle on a tone or feel remotely believable for a single second. It wastes a perfectly capable cast by giving them roles that could never been seen as functional human beings, and it’s so latently sexist and just all around uneasy that it fails at whatever it’s trying to attempt.

TIFF 2013: Labor Day Review

Labor Day Special Presentation Director: Jason Reitman Since 2005’s Thank You for Smoking, Reitman has produced quirky, critical character studies, each slices of odd, complicated inhabitants in their near-highs and terrible lows. (And usually JK Simmons waves hello). In Labor Day, Reitman travels far outside of his comfort zone for a tense drama about the […]

First slate of films announced for TIFF 2013

The first batch of films for this year's Toronto International Film Festival were announced this morning - including opening night film The Fifth Estate - and here's a look at what cinephiles have to look forward to starting this September the 5th.

Jeff, Who Lives at Home Review

We've all known people like the titular character of the Jay and Mark Duplass' Jeff, Who Lives at Home. Nice guys who mean well, but for whatever reason are going nowhere fast. The film suffers from a few of the same maladies that afflict its main character. At times the film feels like an aimless collection of circumstances and encounters because, well, it is precisely that. It's a meandering tale that doesn't really accomplish much in the telling.

Young Adult Review

Sometimes movies take themselves far too seriously for their own good. Writers will come up with ridiculous premises that directors play a bit too straight in hopes that the film ends up saying something meaningful about the human condition. Young Adult is one such film.