Kristen Wiig

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty Review

Although it doesn't work 100% of the time, Ben Stiller's take on James Thurber's famous short story The Secret Life of Walter Mitty shows the filmmaker and actor maturing as an artist full of wonderful vision and boundless ambition that make it a joy to watch.

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues Review

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues is to Anchorman what Ghostbusters 2 was to Ghostbusters. It’s an inferior, but lighthearted and often very funny retread of ground that had been previously covered much better in the original. Sure, it’s often hilarious (in the first half, anyway) and the cast jumps back into their roles quite nicely, but is it a good movie? Nope.

Girl Most Likely Review

Lazy, unfunny, and unfocused even by 1980s made-for-TV movie standards, Girl Most Likely is the rare example of a near perfect disaster.

Despicable Me 2 Review

Although a bit heavier on set pieces and wacky minion hijinks and lighter on the familial drama and heart, Despicable Me 2 is a fleet and funny follow up to the animated smash hit.

TIFF 2012 Reviews; Part 9

For our final round-up of TIFF 2012 reviews we take a look at some great stuff yet to come and some films we're doubling back on with reviews for The Paperboy, Song for Marion, Frances Ha, Room 237, The ABCs of Death, Ghost Graduation, The We and the I, Imogene, Iceberg Slim: Portrait of a Pimp, Outrage Beyond, Come Out and Play, The Lesser Blessed, and The Bay.

Friends With Kids Review

In her first directorial effort and her third screenplay, actress Jennifer Westfeldt has crafted a film that has the look and feel of a modern, feminist Woody Allen film. Friends With Kids balances observational laughs and pathos quite deftly amongst a band of well-to-do New Yorkers with the help of a stellar cast. It shows the growing pains of a talent trying something new, but the strengths greatly outweigh the minuses brought on as a result of a misguided ending.

Paul Review

The masterful cinematic combination of Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg, and Nick Frost have oodles of talent on their own; but bring the three of them together, and they hit a whole new level of brilliance. Separate the trio, and while the work is still very good, it doesn’t quite reach the same peak. Scott Pilgrim is one example of this; and now Paul is another. Not a great film, but a very good one.