Tom Cruise

Home Entertainment Review: Edge of Tomorrow (or, Live, Die, Repeat)

Live, Die, Repeat (or, Edge Of Tomorrow) (Doug Liman, 2014) – It’s been a while since there’s been reason to get excited about a Tom Cruise movie. Though his last decade included the underrated War of the Worlds and the wonderfully goofy Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, good Tom Cruise movies have become the exception and not […]

Play It Again, TIFF

Anchored by a week long run of a restoration of The Godfather Part II, the TIFF Bell Lightbox takes a look at some of history's greatest sequels with their latest film series.

Edge of Tomorrow Review

Edge of Tomorrow is easily one of the best high concept sci-fi blockbusters to come along in a while. It might not be a particularly original movie, but it’s a surprisingly creative one that delivers all of the necessary thrills and spills of good popcorn fodder along with some pretty clever writing and proof that Tom Cruise still has a bit of a gas left in the tank.

Blu-Ray Round-Up: 8/5/13

This week at the video store we check out new Blu-Rays for recent releases Trance, To the Wonder, Oblivion, and Olympus Has Fallen, and two new Criterion releases for The Devil's Backbone and Lord of the Flies.

Oblivion Review

Although somewhat lacking in terms of an all around original story, Oblivion is still a great vehicle for star Tom Cruise and even better for up and coming director Joseph Kosinski.

Interview: Scott Altman

Ever wonder who actually buzzed the tower and flipped off that enemy mig for Tom Cruise in Top Gun? It was this man: Naval Captain and current NASA pilot Scott Altman. We talked to Altman about working with Tom Cruise and Tony Scott in honour of the film's 25th anniversary Blu-Ray release.

The New Old: Guns, Drugs, and Tobacco

This week for the archival DVD and Blu-Ray column we dive into the 3-D Blu-Ray release of Tony Scott's Top Gun, Michael Mann's The Insider, the forgotten about horror flick Schizo, and head over to the TV side of things for The Drunk and on Drugs Happy Funtime Hour, the second season of the Being Human reboot, and The Best of WCW Monday Nitro, Volume 2.

Jack Reacher Review

In one of the most bizarre studio and ego driven productions to be released from a major studio this year, Jack Reacher manages to be too surreal to appeal to action fans and it’s too lunkheaded to appeal to proper cineastes. It’s simultaneously a better version of Alex Cross and a worse reimagining of MacGruber. It’s equally as awesome and awful as that sounds.

The New Old: Shades of Grey and Gray

In this week's archival DVD column we look at some great re-releases including the 40th anniversary of Deliverance, a pair of Criterions featuring Spalding Gray from director Steven Soderbergh, Oliver Stone's Born on the Fourth of July Alfred Hitchcock's The 39 Steps, and some of the best no holds barred matches from the WWE.

Interview: Makeup Artist Gordon Smith

We talk to the extremely candid Canadian makeup design artist Gordon Smith in advance of his appearance at the TIFF Bell Lightbox in Toronto this Wednesday about his groundbreaking work on Near Dark and the X-Men films, as well as his early career and his working with Oliver Stone several times.

Rock of Ages Review

Although overstuffed, lazily plotted, and autotuned nearly into oblivion, the big screen adaptation of the jukebox musical Rock of Ages still has a real kind of shaggy dog charm evocative of the 1980s hair metal scene (minus, you know, any sort of crippling addictions, of course).

Summer Movie Preview: June Part Two

Wrapping up our look at the cinematic offerings for the month of June, we take a look at some real heavy hitters with Brave, Moonrise Kingdom, Prometheus, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, Snow White and the Huntsman, Rock of Ages, and Piranha 3DD, which will undoubtedly win the box office crown for the month.

This Week in DVD: 4/17/12

This week, action and misery seem to be the themes as Andrew Parker takes on Shame and Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol, while Noah Taylor looks at The Divide, and Phil Brown watches Contraband

Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol Review

The law of diminishing returns that often applies to film franchises seemingly doesn’t apply to the Mission: Impossible series. After an okay, but incomprehensible first film, a dreadful second film, and a fun, but needlessly convoluted third film, director Brad Bird comes to the now aging series of spy thrillers to deliver a no-nonsense action film that strays from the elaborate plotting of previous entries in favour of a more straightforward and delightfully boneheaded approach.