Jason Sudeikis

Booksmart Review

To describe Booksmart as a "female Superbad" would be to diminish it as a simple gender flip. It's much more than that – and the fact that the film is so f*cking funny is just the cherry on top.

Drinking Buddies Review

Although perhaps a little bit more commercially minded than his cheaply produced, almost verite, largely improvised mumblecore dramas, Joe Swanberg’s Drinking Buddies takes the same unforced and loose approach as the writer/director/editor/actor’s other creative endeavours and crafts a gentle, sweetly realized look at love and friendship.

We’re the Millers Review

It's not a great comedy, nor an awful one, but We're the Millers does feel like a throwback to some of the more innocuous Hard-R rated comedies of the 1980s in some pretty decent ways.

This Week in DVD: 10/30/12

This week at the video store, we check out the timely comedy of The Campaign, the out of time Oliver Stone thriller Savages, the zombie apocalypse of [REC]3: Genesis, the romantic dramedy stylings of A Little Bit of Heaven and Ruby Sparks, and the goings on in the world of Mad Men.

The Campaign Review

The Campaign tries to strike a balance between R-rated raunch comedy and political satire and it comes surprisingly close to pulling it off. Ultimately, it’s more about the baby punching and wife-banging, but more than enough of those gags land to make it worth your money and laughter.

Horrible Bosses Review

Horrible Bosses does a great job at being good, despite an underwhelming premise. It is one of those films that succeeds by virtue of its casting. Jason Sudeikis, Charlie Day, and Jason Bateman have made a living playing funny straight men: people who want to be normal but their environment won’t let them. They play three middle aged guys who have a typical complaint: they hate their bosses. These bosses, however, are not just annoying kind, but the life destroying kind.

Hall Pass Review

I’m gonna lay it all out for you: If you watched the trailer for Hall Pass and thought “I bet I could tell you, beat by beat, exactly how that movie’s plot is going to go”, then you are likely correct in your assumptions. Save for a some supporting cameos and a few typically-scatological set pieces, the Farrelly brothers’ latest film feels exactly like the marriages it seeks to satirize: good-natured and comfortable, but ultimately tepid and crushingly predictable.