Deep Impact

We Really Like Her: Deep Impact

We Really Like Her podcastWe Really Like Her! is a Toronto-based monthly screening series at the Revue Cinema. It is co-programmed and hosted by Emily Gagne and Danita Steinberg and aims to celebrate and highlight women in film. Our column, coinciding with our monthly screening, will give That Shelf readers a little insight into the thought process behind our film choices — from their cultural significance to why we love them.

This month, we are bringing Mimi Leder’s Deep Impact (1998) back to the big screen.

 

DANITA STEINBERG
@danitasteinberg

A few people have expressed surprise at our choice for August. I get it ⸺ on the surface, Mimi Leder’s Deep Impact does feel a little off-brand for us. But if you’re a fan of our regular programming, I promise that we aren’t really straying too far from our usual fare. Plus, what could possibly be better than an unconventional summer blockbuster with plenty of large-scale action and high stakes melodrama?

We both love genre films so when we discover one directed by a woman, we jump at the chance to show it, especially because it probably didn’t get its due upon release. I don’t usually watch action movies, but the most frequent exception is disaster flicks. Look, I’m bored by guns, cars, and explosions (unless it’s Thelma and Louise we’re talking about), but a comet hurtling towards earth? COUNT. ME. IN.

In 1998, Deep Impact was definitely overshadowed by the massive hit Armageddon, which admittedly, I’ve never seen. Still, I’m willing to bet that Deep Impact takes on the end of the world in a much more bleak, realistic, and complex way. It’s also fronted by a woman journalist, played by the great Téa Leoni. In an era where trustworthy journalism is on its way to becoming extinct, I love seeing her character, Jenny, play a pivotal role in the story.

This film feels like a precursor to another disaster movie I quite like, Lorene Scafaria’s Seeking a Friend for the End of the World. These movies aren’t about stroking the male hero’s ego. They aren’t about reassuring everyone that things will be fine. It’s about real people reacting in all different ways to a very real threat. At its best, Deep Impact sits with the uncomfortable possibility of a mass extinction event, which feels more relevant than ever.


EMILY GAGNE
@emilygagne

Every July, Danita and I take a trip to Niagara, where her dad, Brian, lives. And every year we find ourselves in Brian’s basement planning an impromptu movie marathon, which we program by the very scientific process of pulling paper out of a hat. Last year one of our picks was Deep Impact, a film that I hadn’t seen in years, but remember vaguely liking.

Much to my delight, Deep Impact turned out to be even better than my memory served, offering a strangely comforting mix of astronomy and empathy by way of its star-studded (no pun intended) cast and half-decent special effects. I’m not joking when I say it had me on the edge of my seat. In fact, I got so lost in the over-the-top plot that I sobbed like a baby during most of its climax.

Unlike Danita, I have seen Armageddon. And as a self-proclaimed disaster movie freak (see also: our August 2018 screening of Twister), I can assure you that Deep Impact, with its thoughtful direction by Mimi Leder (who also did The Peacemaker, Pay It Forward and On the Basis of Sex), is the best movie about a comet coming for earth released 25 years ago.

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Not only does Deep Impact feature multiple women in leading roles (see also: Vanessa Redgrave as Téa’s mom and Mary McCormack, the pilot of the spaceship sent up to save the world), it also takes the time to explore how such an earth shattering incident would affect all walks of life. Yes, we spend time with the President of the United States (Morgan Freeman) as he navigates the public response to what might be the end of the times, but we also get to see what happens to the amateur astronomer (cue baby Elijah Wood) who accidentally discovered the comet in the first place.

Mimi Leder isn’t a household name like, say, Michael Bay. But I truly believe she deserves more credit than she gets with the action-loving set. Sure, Armageddon made more money than Deep Impact at the time and featured a hit song by Aerosmith. But Mimi’s movie has aged way better, its unflinching look at the various ways humans cope with crises allowing it to defy space and time.

Deep Impact screens at Toronto’s Revue Cinema August 16 at 7:00 pm. Tickets are available here.

Follow We Really Like Her! on Twitter. They’re taking a break in September but stay tuned for a look at their October screening pick! Check out the archive of their screening posts now.

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Frances Ha

We Really Like Her: Frances Ha

We Really Like Her podcastWe Really Like Her! is a Toronto-based monthly screening series at the Revue Cinema. It is co-programmed and hosted by Emily Gagne and Danita Steinberg and aims to celebrate and highlight women in film. Our column, coinciding with our monthly screening, will give That Shelf readers a little insight into the thought process behind our film choices — from their cultural significance to why we love them.

This month, we are celebrating the 10th anniversary of Frances Ha, starring and co-written by Barbie director Greta Gerwig.

 

EMILY GAGNE
@emilygagne

Before hitting the big time with Lady Bird, Little Women and Barbie, Greta Gerwig was more or less an indie darling.

While she had bit parts in populist fare like No Strings Attached (2011) and the remake of Arthur, up until 2012, Gerwig mainly worked on “mumblecore” films made by the likes of the Duplass Brothers, Ti West and Ry Russo-Young. In 2007, she co-wrote Hannah Takes the Stairs with Joe Swanberg, also her co-director on Nights and Weekends (2008). Then, in 2010, she starred in Greenberg, a film written and directed by her eventual husband and recurring co-collaborator Noah Baumbach. A couple years after getting together, Baumbach and Gerwig wrote the screenplay for Frances Ha, the film that would finally catapult Gerwig from Sundance starlet to Golden Globe nominee and, more importantly, single her out as a woman in film to watch.

Much like her unapologetically femme solo features, Frances Ha is a film that speaks directly to young women, exploring the ups and downs of finding your path while still not knowing who you really want to be. Following 27-year-old dancer Frances Halladay (Gerwig) as she struggles to watch her best friend Sophie (Mickey Sumner) slowly drift away from reach, it feels familiar in ways that may sting, especially if you are in or have just left your late 20s. But this brutal honesty – along with its monochrome colour palette – is what makes it stand out as one of the best films of the 2010s.

Whether you’re excited for Barbie, or are honestly offended by how much space it is currently taking up in the pop culture landscape, I guarantee you can find something to love in Frances Ha. In addition to providing a perfect launching point for Gerwig’s current career path, it is just a wonderfully intimate tribute to the ways in which women are forced to grow, together and apart. It is the kind of movie that we hope you’ll want to watch with your best friend, with matching pink outfits optional.

 


 

DANITA STEINBERG
@danitasteinberg

Frances Ha is such a formative film for me and I’m guessing the same goes for a lot of millennial women. When I first saw it in 2013, I was a similar age to the titular character, 27-year-old Frances. It was an instant favourite and to say it hit close to home is an understatement. It still hits close to home even a decade later. And if you hear someone crying at the back of the Revue Cinema on July 20, no you didn’t (but also, my apologies in advance).

This film perfectly captures the loneliness that comes along with being in a different life stage than your friends, something that really starts happening for the first time in your mid 20s. Early scenes in Frances Ha show best friends Sophie and Frances attached at the hip. When Sophie informs Frances that she is moving out of their shared apartment and into a place with her boyfriend, Frances feels abandoned and left behind. Sophie is entering an exciting new chapter, while Frances is, in some sense, losing her constant companion.

This story gives validity to that particular type of friendship heartbreak, which there just aren’t that many movies about (other than Frances Ha’s two excellent predecessors Girlfriends and Walking & Talking). With so much focus on romantic relationships in pop culture and real life, platonic ones often take a backseat even though they are just as meaningful and important. I love that Frances Ha recognizes how devastating it can be when your person finds a new person.

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Despite its melancholic undertones, Frances Ha is deeply funny, full of the dry, offbeat humour that both Gerwig and Baumbach are known for. It’s also a warm and compassionate film, anchored by Gerwig’s quirky and loveable performance. Frances is undoubtedly one of the most vibrant, endearing characters of the 2010s. She’s just doing her best and you want the best for her.

Okay, now go text your bestie and invite her to our screening and tell her you love her (hi Emily, if you’re reading my section down here)!

Frances Ha screens at Toronto’s Revue Cinema Thursday, July 20. Tickets available here.

Follow We Really Like Her! on Twitter and stay tuned for a look at their August screening pick! Check out the archive of their screening posts now.

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Joan Rivers Piece of Work

We Really Like Her: Joan Rivers — A Piece of Work

We Really Like Her podcastWe Really Like Her! is a Toronto-based monthly screening series at the Revue Cinema. It is co-programmed and hosted by Emily Gagne and Danita Steinberg and aims to celebrate and highlight women in film. Our column, coinciding with our monthly screening, will give That Shelf readers a little insight into the thought process behind our film choices — from their cultural significance to why we love them.

This month, we are bringing Annie Sundberg and Ricki Stern’s Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work (2010) back to the big screen.

 

DANITA STEINBERG
@danitasteinberg

I definitely consider myself a documentary aficionado and I truly think that it’s an overlooked genre by many film-goers. Some of my favourite movies of all-time are documentaries: Grey Gardens, Grizzly Man, Crumb, Stories We Tell, Kedi, Spellbound, Searching for Sugar Man… the list goes on. You could say I’m a bit of a voyeur. But aside from my fascination with watching real life unfold on camera, I love that women filmmakers have always been plentiful in the documentary world because of its relatively low barrier to entry and often DIY sensibility. Documentary filmmaking is such an important part of women’s film history and I’m excited to finally be able to share that through Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work.

I’m also a huge fan of comedy. I grew up watching a lot of stand-up with my Dad. But something was missing: I rarely saw women on Comedy Central or HBO. It was George Carlin, Mitch Hedberg, Richard Pryor, Chris Rock, Robin Williams, all of the usual suspects. When I started doing my own snooping around and finally found Rita Rudner, Whoopi Goldberg, Ellen Degeneres, Roseanne, Rosie O’Donnell, Carol Leifer, Wanda Sykes, Kathy Griffin, Paula Poundstone, and Sandra Bernhard, it was just like a lightbulb went off. And of course, there was always Joan who trail-blazed her way into a male-dominated, extremely misogynist space, paving the way for all of the women that have been making me laugh forever.

It’s no surprise then, that the combination of documentary and comedy makes for a perfect 85 minutes for me. Give me an intimate portrait of a woman in show biz any day of the week! Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work is obviously as funny as Rivers is, but it’s also an unprecedented, tender glimpse into her work ethic, prolific career, and creative process. For a woman who has given us so much, It’s really an honour to be able to celebrate one of the best comedians to ever live with a screening on what would’ve been her 90th birthday.

 


 

EMILY GAGNE
@emilygagne

Unlike Danita, I am not easily drawn to documentaries, usually only finding them at festivals or via recommendations from people like her. Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work, however, is a film I gravitated to on my own and out of interest in its subject, a woman who has fascinated me since I was a little girl watching her call out celebrities for their red carpet faux pas. Feminine, frank and funny in equal measure, Joan Rivers was the epitome of what I’ve always wanted to be: a well-dressed woman who is unwilling to stand down even as she’s standing up (see also: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel).

Much has been said about Joan throughout her career, especially in her latter years when tabloids focused on her plastic surgery over her stage presence. And sure, she’s had her problematic moments, especially when it comes to projecting her body image issues onto others. But, as this documentary rightfully shows, Joan put up with a lot of sexist and anti-semitic shit while trying to make it, breaking down barriers not only for herself but for other women in comedy and Hollywood as a whole (see: clips of her defending women like Sean Young on her short-lived talk show). This pursuit turned her into a workaholic who simply could not pass up the opportunity to pursue a punchline, sometimes at her own expense – how unfortunately relatable.

But Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work doesn’t just focus on Joan as a comedian and pop culture icon. It also gives us unprecedented access to her as a person, with directors Annie Sunberg and Ricki Stern taking us along for car rides with her grandson and on trips to deliver meals to families in need (in case you didn’t know, Joan has always been very charitable). And then there are moments of reflection where Joan breaks down as she recalls her early days, lamenting the loss of her peers (and thus, the loss of their shared memories) and her late husband Edgar.

Love or hate Joan, she was a groundbreaking force in comedy and ongoing ally to the queer community, both of which are absolutely worth celebrating this Pride Month. If only she was still here to mark her birthday with us and this loving tribute to her sassy, yet sparkly legacy.

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Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work screens at Toronto’s Revue Cinema Thursday, June 8th. Tickets available here.

Follow We Really Like Her! on Twitter and stay tuned for a look at their July screening pick! Check out the archive of their screening posts now.



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The Brady Bunch Movie

We Really Like Her: The Brady Bunch Movie

We Really Like Her podcastWe Really Like Her! is a Toronto-based monthly screening series at the Revue Cinema. It is co-programmed and hosted by Emily Gagne and Danita Steinberg and aims to celebrate and highlight women in film. Our column, coinciding with our monthly screening, will give That Shelf readers a little insight into the thought process behind our film choices — from their cultural significance to why we love them.

This month, we are bringing The Brady Bunch Movie (1995) back to the big screen.

 

EMILY GAGNE
@emilygagne

Growing up femme in the ‘90s was a true gift. The era of so-called “girl power” wasn’t only a great time for empowering pop acts. It was also the heyday of studio comedies written and directed by women.

When I think of the comedy films that define my sense of humour, two ‘90s flicks immediately come to mind: Wayne’s World (1992) and The Brady Bunch Movie (1995). Directed by Penelope Spheeris (The Little Rascals, Black Sheep) and Betty Thomas (Private Parts, John Tucker Must Die) respectively, these movies manage the near impossible feat of balancing pop culture commentary with heart, their thoughtful threads about friendship and family stacked up against cameos from Alice Cooper and Davy Jones. This is why, despite their timely references, they are as good now as they were when they came out.

While we have been lucky to screen Wayne’s World at the Revue Cinema already, Danita and I have been waiting for the right moment to present The Brady Bunch Movie. The more underrated of the two, we truly believe it deserves to be as referenced as Wayne’s World, if not more.

Thanks to Thomas’s warm and wacky direction and the stacked cast led by Gary Cole and Shelley Long, The Brady Bunch Movie is more than just a satire of a beloved sitcom. Yes, the script references the show a fair amount (see: Christine Taylor’s Marcia getting hit in the face with a football). But it speaks to the ‘90s as much as it does the late ‘60s and early ‘70s, with the Bradys appearing adorably out of touch with their time period as they interact with the likes of RuPaul (as a fabulous guidance counselor who interacts with Jennifer Elise Cox’s pitch perfect Jan), and Michael McKean and Jean Smart (as nosey neighbours the Dittmeyers).

Betty Thomas may not be a household name like Nora Ephron, Nancy Meyers and Penny Marshall, but her comedic output deserves to be celebrated alongside them. The actress-turned-filmmaker has two films in the top 25 highest grossing films made by women (Dr. Doolittle and Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel). She is, like this movie, truly happening in a far out way!

 


 

DANITA STEINBERG
@danitasteinberg

I was raised by the glow of TV Land and Nick at Nite, both of which played the original television show so I was already well acquainted with one of pop culture’s most beloved families. I always enjoyed its wholesome and earnest sensibility. Plus, the theme song is a banger. Man, I really miss good theme songs. Anyway, by the time I saw The Brady Bunch Movie, I was primed to love it. I don’t even want to know how many times I watched that VHS tape, plus the dozens of times I caught it on cable.

One of my favourite parts about programming is when we can tap into that nostalgia, which we’ve done before with films like Crossroads, My Girl, and Mermaids. It’s so much fun to be in a theatre with an audience of millennials (and mostly women and queer folks) who were also total weirdos as kids. It’s also great to be able to share these films with the younger generation (I’m literally crying thinking about the group of tween girls at our screening of Harriet the Spy). These are movies they probably won’t stumble upon while channel-surfing because that’s not a thing that exists for them! And not to sound old, but they just don’t make off-beat, live action movies that appeal to kids anymore.

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Like Emily mentioned, some of the best comedies to come out of the 90s were directed by women. Even though I didn’t realize it at the time, I love that these women shaped my sense of humour with films like Look Who’s Talking and Look Who’s Talking Too (Amy Heckerling), Billy Madison (Tamra Davis), A Very Brady Sequel (Arlene Sanford), Dr. Doolittle, and The Little Rascals. I’m grateful to all of them.

The Brady Bunch Movie is an oddball movie that feels like a fever dream. It’s satire, but in the kindest way possible. The writers (Bonnie and Terry Turner, Laurice Elehwany, and Rick Copp) and director Betty Thomas honoured the innocence and sincerity of the original, while also turning those old-fashioned ideals on their head. That subversiveness, paired with its campy energy and kooky cast of characters is what makes The Brady Bunch Movie a timeless classic that will never go out of style.

The Brady Bunch Movie screens at Toronto’s Revue Cinema Thursday, May 18th. Tickets available here.

Follow We Really Like Her! on Twitter and stay tuned for a look at their June screening pick!

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Parker Posey in Party Girl

We Really Like Her: Party Girl

Rad as hell.

We Really Like Her podcastWe Really Like Her! is a Toronto-based monthly screening series at the Revue Cinema. It is co-programmed and hosted by Emily Gagne and Danita Steinberg and aims to celebrate and highlight women in film. Our column, coinciding with our monthly screening, will give That Shelf readers a little insight into the thought process behind our film choices — from their cultural significance to why we love them.

This month, we are bringing Daisy von Scherler Mayer’s Party Girl (1995) back to the big screen.

 

EMILY GAGNE
@emilygagne

Parker Posey is often celebrated as a stellar supporting player, her roles in the Christopher Guest universe are seen as particular standouts in her wonderfully eclectic filmography, which also includes bit parts in Dazed and Confused, You’ve Got Mail, Josie and the Pussycats and Scream 3. But Posey is a killer leading lady too, as evidenced by the great films she starred in during the late ‘90s. This run began with 1995’s Party Girl, which gave Posey her first leading role.

What makes Parker Posey so irresistible is her dry wit, which, when paired with her willingness to “turn it up to eleven,” makes her a wholly unique personality. Both of these skills are on full display in Daisy von Scherler Mayer’s Party Girl, a film that fully understands how to channel Posey’s powers. From the scenes of her character (socialite-turned-librarian Mary) tearing it up on the dancefloor to the sequence when she discovers the joys of the Dewey Decimal System, you simply can’t take your eyes off of her or her absolutely outrageous outfits (extra special shout-out to costume designer Michael Clancy).

With someone else in the role, you might not be able to forgive some of Mary’s sins (see: that Middle Eastern party she throws, complete with culturally appropriative fashions). But with Posey at the centre, you can’t help but stick around to see what stackside shenanigans Mary gets up to next. You leave the film wanting an invite to Mary’s next shindig, or at least a chance to have her reorganize your record collection while you eat a falafel with hot sauce, a side order of baba ganoush and a seltzer.

As We Really Like Her! was designed to celebrate the under-appreciated women in front of and behind the camera, I hope that our Party Girl screening gives people a chance to appreciate Parker Posey for the true star she is, and always has been.


 

DANITA STEINBERG
@danitasteinberg

The only time I’ve seen Party Girl is when Emily and I took a trip to Los Angeles and we were lucky enough to catch a screening of it at the iconic New Beverly Cinema. It was a print of the film, and director Daisy von Scherler Mayer was in attendance. This was five years ago and we’ve wanted to program it ever since.

The challenge of programming films directed by women (and other marginalized filmmakers!) is sometimes they are near impossible to find. To screen a film, you have to pay a distributor for the rights to do so. If those rights don’t exist or they’ve been lost into the ether, you’re out of luck. It’s also ideal to have a DCP (Digital Cinema Package) or a Blu-ray to play, but of course, many films that are undervalued or deemed unimportant often don’t get made into those formats. In our years of programming, we’ve come up against these obstacles several times. This was the case for Party Girl. Then, a few months ago, it was announced that the film was finally getting a shiny 4K restoration Blu-ray. AS IT DESERVES! So, we jumped on it.

Like many of us, I spent my tween years watching movies in which the girl has to get a complete makeover to be an acceptable member of society: straightening her hair, ditching her glasses, getting her nose out of books. As a curly-haired, glasses-wearing bookworm, THAT WAS NOT THE MESSAGE I NEEDED IN MY FORMATIVE YEARS! Anyway, Party Girl is a different kind of coming-of-age story; one I wish I had back then.

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What I love most about the film is just how subversive it is. It might be the only instance of a woman transitioning into glasses instead of out of them. That healed something in me. Not only that, Mary also discovers her passion for books, knowledge, and library sciences. Again, I felt seen. The movie is more about getting a career than getting a guy (even though she does that, too), which is radical even today. On a self-discovery journey, Mary is the living embodiment of fearlessly being your true self: fashionable, cool, independent, driven, life of the party, and smart all at the same time. That’s rad as hell.

Party Girl screens at Toronto’s Revue Cinema Thursday, April 13th, with a video introduction from director Daisy von Scherler Mayer. Tickets available here.

Follow We Really Like Her! on Twitter and stay tuned for a look at their May screening pick!



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Mamma Mia!

We Really Like Her: Mamma Mia!

Thank you for the Meryl.

We Really Like Her podcastWe Really Like Her! is a Toronto-based monthly screening series at the Revue Cinema. It is co-programmed and hosted by Emily Gagne and Danita Steinberg and aims to celebrate and highlight women in film. Our column, coinciding with our monthly screening, will give That Shelf readers a little insight into the thought process behind our film choices — from their cultural significance to why we love them.

This month, we are bringing Phyllida Lloyd’s Mamma Mia! (2008) back to the big screen.

 

DANITA STEINBERG
@danitasteinberg

Musical lovers are often woefully starved at the box office. In the fifteen years (!!!) since Mamma Mia’s release, there have only been about a dozen live-action, big-budget musicals and a lot of them are pretty bad (do not talk to me about Nine or Mary Poppins Returns). This is part of the reason I love revisiting Mamma Mia! at least once a year, especially in March when grey slush is everywhere you look here in Toronto. After last year’s screening at the Revue Cinema was such a hit, Emily and I decided it would be an annual tradition.

In 2008, it was the height of the Meryl-aissance. She’s always been one of our most talented and beloved actors, but between 2006 and 2011, she made 13 films. All of a sudden, a woman in her late 50s and early 60s was one of our biggest box office draws. That had literally never happened before and I was loving every second of it. At the time, Mamma Mia! was the highest grossing film directed by a woman, as well as starring a woman over 50.

On a personal note, I’ve been a huge Meryl Streep fan for most of my life, spending my high school years devouring her 50+ movie filmography. Then, several years ago, she became even more dear to me when Emily and I, very new in our friendship, started our first podcast, What About Meryl?. Over the course of a year, we watched her films and talked about them every week, learning a lot about each other in the process. So, programming and watching any Meryl Streep movie together will forever be special.

Above all else, though, I just genuinely love this dang movie. It is joy personified and you can tell the entire cast is having the time of their lives. The chemistry between Meryl Streep, Christine Baranski, and Julie Walters is off the charts, Amanda Seyfried is charming as hell, and Pierce Brosnan, Colin Firth, and Stellan Skarsgård are delightfully goofy, happy to take the backseat and let all the women shine.

While it may get shrugged off by some cynical grumps, I will be celebrating Mamma Mia! until the end of my days. Director Phylida Lloyd made a beautiful, colourful, feel-good movie that demands to be seen with an ABBA-loving crowd. Our screenings are a safe space for dancing and singing and crying, so the vibes will be immaculate.


EMILY GAGNE
@emilygagne

Here we go again!

When we first screened Mamma Mia! at the Revue Cinema last March, the audience erupted into applause as soon as “Dancing Queen” finished. At first I thought it was because that song is an eternal banger, the ABBA track that everyone and their grandma can recite from memory. But on further reflection I realized that this was likely a moment of catharsis for our overtly femme audience. After all, it is a scene rarely seen on the big screen: a horde of women of all different generations shirking their responsibilities to shake it by the sea, each and every one of them feeling the beat from the tambourine (oh yeah!) in their own special way.

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While I love Mamma Mia! for the many reasons Danita states above, one of the things that keeps me (and I’m sure many others) coming back to this endlessly charming film is the fact that it unabashedly celebrates women’s agency, especially in terms of sexual expression.

Sure, it helps that someone like Meryl Streep gets more and more stunning as she ages. But her character (single mom and small business owner Donna Sheridan) isn’t the only one who gets to, well, get it in Mamma Mia!. From the scenes of Amanda Seyfried’s Sophie reading salacious stories straight out of her mom’s diary to Christine Baranski’s Tanya seducing young men on the beach, this movie isn’t afraid to suggest that women can and should do whatever they want, with whomever they want, at any and all ages.

A movie made by a woman with women in mind, it’s no wonder Mamma Mia! was such a success upon release and remains so beloved. Like the popular stage musical that came before it, it aimed to represent the underrepresented way before larger calls to action to do so, and it did it all with such passion and so little pretension. To paraphrase the eternally catchy title track, how could we resist programming it?

Mamma Mia! screens at Toronto’s Revue Cinema on March 23 at 6:45 pm.

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Follow We Really Like Her! on Twitter and stay tuned for a look at their April screening pick!



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