Alfred Hitchcock

Hitchcock/Truffaut Review

Hitchcock/Truffaut celebrates the meeting of two of cinemas greatest filmmakers. But is it a deep enough dive to satisfy cinephiles?

Films in Brief: 2/16/14

Since all three of this week's major releases all press screened at the same night and time during the week, here now are our reviews of the smart and funny remake of About Last Night and the astoundingly and laughably awful Winter's Tale. Also, an explanation as to why we don't have new reviews for Endless Love or Gloria, we double back on last week's never press screened Vampire Academy, we a look at Pussy Riot: A Punk Rock Prayer, which was the only new film at the Bloor this week, a special sneak at The Bloor tonight, family day offerings at The Bloor and the TIFF Bell Lightbox, and a look ahead to a Lightbox retrospective of some of Jean-Luc Godard's favourite Hollywood films starting on Thursday.

Interview: Chan-wook Park

Dork Shelf talked to famed Korean director Chan-Wook Park (Oldboy) about where his desire to tell such dark stories springs from, why he selected Stoker for his North American debut, the casting process, his identifying with the work of Alfred Hitchcock, and his study of film criticism and philosophy.

Hitchcock Review

While it was inevitable that someone would make a big screen biopic about one of the world's most prominent directors, Hichcock is only a mildly entertaining and watchable film with a complete and utter disregard for the history of the man at the centre of it so the filmmakers can create drama that wasn't there originally.

The New Old: The Master of Suspense

Universal has released a collection of most of Alfred Hitchcocks' most notable films. It's light on special features, but still an excellent and good looking set. Here's a look back at the man with the most famous silhouette and a taste for murder.

The New Old: Love & Darkness

This week's archival home entertainment column takes a look at some real heavy hitters with Alfred Hitchcock's Strangers on a Train, Wong Kar Wai's In the Mood for Love, Stanley Kubrick's Fear and Desire, the campy Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?, and director's cuts of both Frank Oz's Little Shop of Horrors and the Al Pacino ham-fest The Devil's Advocate.

Dial M for Murder

It probably doesn’t need a review or a re-evaluation of any kind (which is why this isn’t really classified as a review), so consider this a message to all of you in Toronto that Alfred Hitchcock’s wonderful Dial M for Murder will be screening at the TIFF Bell Lightbox this week in its original 3D, albeit digitally projected with a pristine 4K restoration. For those of you who don’t live in Toronto or those who want to own it, you can buy the 3D Blu-ray on October 9th. But might we persuade you, though, to go see it on the big screen?