Martin Scorsese

The 50 Year Argument Review

Co-directed by Martin Scorsese, the documentary The 50 Year Argument delivers the rich history behind the fabled New York Times Review of Books.

TIFF 2014: Revenge of the Green Dragons Review

Revenge of the Green Dragons Special Presentations It’s very easy to see why Martin Scorsese produced the latest film from Andrew Lau. Not only did Lau create the successful Infernal Affairs franchise that would allow Marty to make The Departed, but this decade spanning and thoroughly brutish crime saga (a collaboration with co-director Andrew Loo) […]

Play It Again, TIFF

Anchored by a week long run of a restoration of The Godfather Part II, the TIFF Bell Lightbox takes a look at some of history's greatest sequels with their latest film series.

20 Sleeper Hits You Can Rent for Free from Bay Street Video

Our film editor was asked to contribute to a list of dozens of "sleeper hits" that can currently be rented free of charge from Bay Street Video in Toronto. Given the vague definition of the term, here is why he chose his films on the list and gives recommendations for other films to pair alongside the free rentals.

Home Entertanment Round-Up: 4/7/14

We kick off this Home Entertainment round-up with two Martin Scorsese comedies - The King of Comedy and The Wolf of Wall Street - before looking at new releases for Sam Raimi's Darkman, Howard Hawks' El Dorado, Will Ferrell and Adam McKay's Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues, and Paul Schrader's remake of Cat People. There's also some B-movie goodness with looks at Alec Baldwin in The Shadow, the 1980s horror flick Night of the Demons, and the made for TV 1973 thriller The Horror at 37,000 Feet

The Wolf of Wall Street Review

Martin Scorsese's best and most thoroughly insane film in years, The Wolf of Wall Street isn't for everyone and is bound to be misread by people not willing to think about the rampant greed, avarice, and drug use on display, but for those who can stomach the breakneck paced three hours with one of the worst human beings in screen history, it's a very rewarding experience.

Seduced and Abandoned Review

James Toback and Alec Baldwin's take on the Cannes film festival marketplace Seduced and Abandoned is a disarming look at a pair of established Hollywood players with huge egos in an industry that has seen the almighty dollar sign replace star power and authorial intent.

One Direction: This Is Us Review

As one might guess One Direction: This Is Us (from already noted sell-out documentarian Morgan Spurlock) is more of a commercial for the band's success aimed squarely at fans who will never once admit their dreamboats are manufactured. That's fine. As is the manufacture music. Those 3D musical numbers, though, still aren't any interesting thanks to a clear and distinct lack of stage presence.

Wake in Fright Review

Wake in Fright is a strange little Australian nightmare that was almost lost to obscurity. It’s not always an easy film to watch, particularly for animal lovers, but it is a dark, twisted, and unforgettable experience for those who have a taste for such things.

Defending the Indefensible: 70s Auteur Flops

As the 1970s came to a close, many of the best filmmakers of the past century nearly had their careers ruined as studios asserted more control over them during the emergence of blockbuster cinema. Here we take a look at some of those special cases: Scorsese's New York New York, Friedkin's Sorcerer, Spielberg's 1941, Cimino's Heaven's Gate, Altman's Popeye, and Coppola's One from the Heart.

The New Old: Not-So-Teenage Wasteland

This week's archival DVD column takes a look at various people of different backgrounds struggling to find themselves, as we look at Martin Scorsese's debut, Mean Streets, a pair of films from Whit Stillman, the first season of the UK TV show The Inbetweeners, and Jim Jarmusch's Down By Law