Steven Spielberg

Jurassic Park 3D Review

As a film, Jurassic Park is just as thrilling as ever, having not aged a day, and thankfully an upgrade and re-release in 3-D for its 20th anniversary does the film a considerable amount of justice.

This Week in DVD: 3/26/13

Did you miss almost all of our theatrical coverage around the holidays? Well this week we look at some of the biggest late 2012 releases including The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, Lincoln, Les Miserables, This is 40, and Zero Dark Thirty. Also, looks at Killing Them Softly and the Canadian made sci-fi romance Mars et Avril.

Interview: Patrick Read Johnson

Dork Shelf talks to Patrick Read Johnson about his long in the works autobiographical film 5-25-77 and it's long road to the big screen despite being a small film about how he got started as a filmmaker growing up in small town Illinois. Johnson opens up about growing disillusioned with the studio system (working with John Hughes on Baby's Day Out, turning down the chance to do Home Alone, and the troubled post production on Angus), the good along the way, and bringing his work-in-progress film to the TIFF Next Wave Festival this weekend.

News Shelf: 18/01/13

And now, all the film, game, and comic news that’s fit to print. Gremlins might be getting the reboot treatment, Cuarón's Gravity gets a release date, Dead Island: Riptide offends with crass Collector's Edition, fan campaign gets JRPG localized, the X-Men become an all-female team and the internet loses its shit, and DC Comics cancels a boatload of titles.

Defending the Indefensible: 70s Auteur Flops

As the 1970s came to a close, many of the best filmmakers of the past century nearly had their careers ruined as studios asserted more control over them during the emergence of blockbuster cinema. Here we take a look at some of those special cases: Scorsese's New York New York, Friedkin's Sorcerer, Spielberg's 1941, Cimino's Heaven's Gate, Altman's Popeye, and Coppola's One from the Heart.

The New Old: Robbin’ and Stealin’

This week's archival home entertainment column looks back at Michael Cimino's infamous box office flop Heaven's Gate, the strangely forgotten about Steven Spielberg hit Catch Me If You Can, and the classic noir The Postman Always Rings Twice.

The New Old:
Nothing But Classics

Just in time for your Black Friday holiday shopping sprees, Phil Brown takes a look at some of the biggest classics for film buffs and genre buffs that are currently on Blu-ray retailer shelves: Lawrence of Arabia, E.T., They Live, Dark Star, Bill and Ted's Excellent Adventure, Sunset Boulevard, and Rosemary's Baby,

Lincoln Review

It might still have Steven Spielberg's trademark streak of sentimentality, but Lincoln might be the director's most satisfying historical drama to date,

War Horse Review

Sometimes it’s obvious when a big name director is actively trying to win ALL THE OSCARS. Steven Spielberg’s War Horse is one of those painfully obvious movies, but that's not to say that the film is at all bad or unwatchable. This tale of a young man and the horse that touched the lives of everyone who came in contact with it is a splendid World War I yarn made with the skill and craft one would expect from a Spielberg production, but one can’t seem to shake the feeling that it’s all a bit overbearing.

The Adventures of Tintin Review

It is rare that a film is released in Europe before North America, unless it is a European production. And while The Adventures of Tintin is technically not European, its roots are, and so its release here in the United Kingdom last week was appropriate.

Real Steel Review

It might seem hard to believe that the guy who made the remakes of Cheaper by the Dozen and The Pink Panther got something incredibly right, but he honestly knocks his latest film, Real Steel, out of the park. Shawn Levy gets right what Michael Bay has gotten wrong over the course of three straight Transformers films. Real Steel is a gratifying and visually stylish blend of high end special effects and a lowbrow, meat-headed story. Most importantly, Levy and his team of writers keep things simple by applying the standard sports movie template to a film about robots beating the snot out of each other.

Super 8 Review

It’s safe to say that many filmgoers will always measure newcomer sci-fi epics by the standards of the classics that came before them. Close Encounters of the Third Kind, E.T. and the now thirty-to-forty year old peers that reserve warm fuzzy spots in hearts around the globe. So it was both interesting and completely logical that Steven Spielberg, creator of these titan classics, would use the talents of J. J. Abrams, undeniably a contemporary lord of genre, to, in essence, create a new film that makes tribute to his own triumphs.

Tintin Trailer

Tintin is not just a comic series; for many, it's a religion. The Adventures of Tintin has been in works for a while, and finally we have a trailer. With Steven Spielberg directing, Peter Jackson producing, Edgar Wright, Steven Moffat & Joe Cornish writing, and Jamie Bell, Nick Frost and Simon Pegg (among others) acting, I have high hopes for this film.

Free screening of Clue and Jurassic Park!

Ladies and Gentlemen, the Toronto Underground Cinema is celebrating our one year anniversary on May 15th. We've survived our first year, it's taken a lot of blood sweat and beers, but we made it. So we're going to celebrate the only way we know how... by showing movies! Not just any movies, but two of our favourites, films that are near and dear to our hearts: Clue & Jurassic Park!